What I’m Reading

… in no particular order. Though the most current reads are towards the top.

Bibliography is followed by brief summaries and comments on select texts.

Watkins, S. C. (2018). The digital edge: How Black and Latino youth navigate digital inequality. New York University Press.

Giroux, H. A. (1997). Pedagogy and the politics of hope: Theory, culture, and schooling; a critical reader. Westview Press.

Morris, S. M., & Stommel, J. (2018). An urgency of teachers: The work of critical digital pedagogy. Hybrid Pedagogy Inc.

Pink, S., Horst, H. A., Postill, J., Hjorth, L., Lewis, T., & Tacchi, J. (Eds.). (2016). Digital ethnography: Principles and practice. SAGE.

Kozinets, R. (2019). Netnography: The essential guide to qualitative social media research (3rd edition). SAGE Publications.

Snyder, T. (2017). On tyranny: Twenty lessons from the twentieth century (First edition). Tim Duggan Books.

Doll, M. A. (2019). The mythopoetics of currere: Memories, dreams and literary texts as teaching avenues to self-study.

Okorafor, N. (2015). Binti. Tom Doherty Associates.

Smith, L. T. (2012). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples (Second edition). Zed Books.

Smith, L. T., Tuck, E., & Yang, K. W. (Eds.). (2019). Indigenous and decolonizing studies in education: Mapping the long view. Routledge.

Butler, O. E. (1997a). Adulthood rites (Reiss). Warner Books.

Butler, O. E. (1997b). Dawn. Warner Books.

Lawrence-Lightfoot, S., & Hoffmann Davis, J. (1997). The art and science of portraiture. Jossey-Bass.

Ellsworth, E. (1997). Teaching Positions: Difference, Pedagogy, and the Power of Address. Teachers College Press.

boyd, danah. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens (1. Aufl). Yale University press.

Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed (30th anniversary ed). Continuum.

Giroux, H. A. (2016). When Schools Become Dead Zones of the Imagination: A Critical Pedagogy Manifesto. The High School Journal, 351–359.

Giroux, H. A. (2021, March 26). Threat of Authoritarianism Is No Longer on the Horizon: It’s Arrived in the GOP. Truthout. https://truthout.org/articles/threat-of-authoritarianism-is-no-longer-on-the-horizon-its-arrived-in-the-gop/

Jenkins, H., Itō, M., & boyd, danah. (2015). Participatory culture in a networked era: A conversation on youth, learning, commerce, and politics. Polity Press.

Kohl, H. R. (1995). “I won’t learn from you”: And other thoughts on creative maladjustment. New Press : Distributed by W.W. Norton.

Anzalduá, G. (1987). Borderlands: The new mestiza = La frontera (1. ed). Aunt Lute Books.


After reading the first essay, I allowed myself a slow, luxurious read, taking a month to absorb 297 pages. Dipping in and out only when I had the time to sit with Morris and Stommel’s poetic and passionate appeal for a more critical, human-centered (digital) pedagogy. I put parens around digital because while “it is inextricably bound up in the work of teaching and learning”, it is “coterminous with pedagogy…with critical pedagogy, given the degree to which the digital can function both as a tool for and an obstacle to liberation” (Morris & Stommel, 2018, pp. 19-20). I highly recommend this text as well as an exploration of the associated site, Hybrid Pedagogy and its associated podcast, Teacher of the Ear, for any educator who has “gone digital” or is “digital curious”. Back to top

A helpful, efficient, and effective text for those who are looking to bring the digital to their methodology as well as considering the digital as a type of ethnography. Of particular use is the authors’ organizing the text into theoretical and explanatory initial chapters that frame specific applications in subsequent chapters (i.e: Researching Experiences, Researching Practices, Researching Things, etc.)A helpful, efficient, and effective text for those who are looking to bring the digital to their methodology as well as considering the digital as a type of ethnography. Of particular use is the authors’ organizing the text into theoretical and explanatory initial chapters that frame specific applications in subsequent chapters (i.e: Researching Experiences, Researching Practices, Researching Things, etc.) Back to top

A 3rd edition treatise of sorts calling for “netnography” as a type of ethnography that identifies culture-forming groups specific to the internet in all its flavors. The introduction and the first three chapters provide an interesting historiography of the internet from its first ping in 1969 as ARPAnet right on up to current times. Kozinets spotlights what he considers seminal and quality ethnographic research that studies netizen culture(s) and fits certain netnographic criteria or are outright netnographies. The rest of the chapters lay out a “how-to” for conducting netnographic research. For those of a certain age who lived through and were active users during the dawning of the public internet might find the first few chapters downright nostalgic. I know I did! Back to top

“History does not repeat, but it does instruct.” Thus Snyder frames the lessons in this pocket-sized, 127-pager, invoking the “Founding Fathers” of American democracy and their drawing from history to identify and guard against the rise of tyranny in their new republic. Pointing contemporary readers to “more recent and relevant examples than ancient Greece and Rome”, Snyder delivers “[t]he bad news… that the history of modern democracy is also one of decline and fall. That since the founding of the US, Europe has seen “three major democratic moments” (post-WWI, post-WWII, and the fall of communism) and several of the various democracies founded in those moments did not survive “in circumstances that in some important respects resemble our own.” Before Snyder turns to lay out a each 4-5-page lesson, he warns, “Americans today are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism in the twentieth century. Our advantage is that we might learn from their experience. Now is a good time to do so.” Back to top